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Video of Vito Marcantonio Memorial at City Hall Park 2016

We are proud to announce the release of the latest Vito Marcantonio Forum video!

Thanks to VMF co-founder David Giglio, who films and edits our events, we have a brand new video! Please share it with everyone you know via email, social media, etc.

In addition to everyone in attendance, we also like to specially thank the following speakers:

  • Hon. Melissa Mark-Viverito, Speaker of the NYC Council
  • Hon. Gale Brewer, Manhattan Borough President
  • Gloria Quinones, East Harlem Community Activist, Attorney, Advocate

Click below for the latest Vito Marcantonio Forum video:

Nelson A. Denis Book Presentation at the Mulberry St Library

April 6th, 2016
Mulberry Street branch of the New York Public Library

War Against all Puerto Ricans: Revolution & Terror in America’s Colony
– Nelson A. Denis, Nation Books, NY 2015

Nelson A. Denis book presentation poster 2016 Vito Marcantonio ForumGil Fagiani brought the night’s event to order. Over 40 attendees heard a brief summary of the Many events the Vito Marcantonio Forum (VMF) has organized through the year and the VMF members who contributed their time and talents to these events. He officially opened the night’s event by reciting the Litany of San Vito, a poem he wrote and dedicated to the late, great congressman from East Harlem, New York City, who the VMF models their nonprofit after.

Nelson A. Denis began by giving some background of U.S. involvement in Puerto Rico; for example, by introducing U.S. dollars and eliminating the Puerto Rican peso (the Spanish peso)—in this exchange—the latter currency lost 40% of its value, thereby causing widespread poverty, loss of many businesses, collapse of banks and numerous financial institutions. Four corporations ended up owning almost half of all the sugar fields of the entire island.

Gil Fagiani, Nelson Denis, Roberto Ragone

Gil Fagiani, Nelson Denis, Roberto Ragone

“Vito Marcantonio was the most able, courageous, and principled defenders and friend of the Puerto Rican people. Much more principled than most Puerto Rican politicians of the times,” said Mr. Denis.

Denis’ presentation was energetic and impassioned. The audience felt his beliefs and outrage as he described the violent repression unleashed on the opponents of American intervention.

After the book presentation, Roberto Ragone, co-chairman of the VMF, ably dramatized two Vito Marcantonio speeches. At the end of the performance he received an enthusiastic applause and praise from Mr. Denis and the audience. Denis’ talk and Ragone’s performance blended together seamlessly to give flesh and form to Denis’ words.

Nelson A. Denis with Vito Marcantonio Forum Treasurer, Adam Milat-Meyer

Nelson A. Denis with Vito Marcantonio Forum Treasurer, Adam Milat-Meyer

The efforts by Gil Fagiani in organizing this event must not go unnoticed. His labors of putting on this event manifested themselves in the excellent presentations of Mr. Ragone, the impassioned and sometimes humorous words of Mr. Denis, and the support and intelligent curiosity displayed by the audience which filled the room at the Mulberry Street Public Library.

The group thanks David Giglio for filming the event, which soon will be released on this site (please check back frequently). The Mulberry Street branch of the New York Public Library for providing the event space deserves much thanks as well. Last but not least, Nelson A. Denis for his inspirational and fascinating presentation and Q&A discussion.

Click on the following link to purchase the book:
War Against All Puerto Ricans by Nelson A. Denis.  

Luis Romero
Cofounder/blogger of the VMF

Thank You for Attending our Walking Tour of East Harlem

September 19th, 2015

Over forty people gathered at the Lucky Corner on East 116th St & Lexington Ave for “Walking in the Footsteps of Vito Marcantonio,” a walking tour of East Harlem. Another cultural/educational event sponsored by the Vito Marcantonio Forum.

Vito Marcantonio Forum - Melissa Mark-Viverito with Gerald Meyer and Roberto Ragone

Professor Gerald Meyer with Melissa Mark-Viverito. Photo by Daniel A. Nelson of the Columbia School of Journalism.

 

VMF Co-Chairman, Dr. Gerald Meyer, spotted Speaker of the City Council, Melissa Mark-Viverito in the crowd and promptly summoned her to the microphone where she said enthusiastically:

“This is a great way of remembering someone who is a great individual. Following in the footsteps of places that were important to Vito — someone who fought really hard on issues that we still care about today — in terms of living wage, in terms of immigrant rights… I feel really proud to represent a district that had been represented by Marcantonio.” 

Vito Marcantonio Forum - LuLu LoLo Pascale

Playwright/Actor and Performance Artist LuLu LoLo Pascale shares her early memories of Marcantonio.

The walking tour continued with a re-enactment of Marcantonio’s speech at the Lucky Corner by actor, activist, and Co-Chair of the VMF Roberto Ragone.

At a stop in front of educator Leonard Covello’s home at E116th Street, writer and performance artist LuLu LoLo Pascale, related her memories of having known Marcantonio and Covello as a child. She also read an excerpt from Covello’s breakthrough autobiogrphy, The Heart Is the Teacher.

A walking tour stop on E116th Street included a visit to Haarlem House, which was later renamed LaGuardia Memorial House. Pascale and Dr. Meyer discussed the historical significance of what was originally the Home Garden Settlement. What was interesting was a street vendor in front said he knew Marcantonio and that it was he who got his mother an apartment back in 1949.

VMF - Christopher Bell_walking tour of east harlem 2015

East Harlem native, Author and Historian, Christopher Bell.

Local author and historian, Christopher Bell, who has a chapter about Marcantonio in first book, Remembering East Harlem, discussed the importance of the next stop at 247 East 116th Street (between Second and Third Avenues): The Fiorello LaGuardia Political Association and later the Vito Marcantonio Political Association was often referred to as the “political club.”

Our Lady Queen of Angels School on 229 E112th St, New York and 229 E113th Street Our Lady Queen of Angels Church on 229 E112 Street are important for the fact that they will be at the site of a Papal visit next week.

Attorney Frank Marcantonio, who is a relative of Vito, read a letter to Cardinal Dolan about how Cardinal Spellman denied Vito Marcantonio a Catholic burial during the crazed Joseph McCarthy anti-communist era. The walking tour ended at Our Lady Of Mount Carmel Church, the site of Marcantonio’s baptism.

The Vito Marcantonio Forum thanks all who helped in presenting at the various stops as well as those who helped with audio & video, making signs, writing copy, contacting press, promotion, and more: Rita Barakos, Christopher Bell, Lizette Colón, Gil Fagiani, Lionel Francois, David Giglio, Maria Lisella, Frank Marcantonio, Adam Meyer, Gerald Meyer, Daniel A. Nelson, LuLu LoLo Pascale, Roberto Ragone, Luis Romero, Rosemary Siciliano, and many all who supported the cause — we cannot thank you enough!

Melissa Mark-Viverito looks on as Gerald Meyer speaks about Marcantonio altered on online photo application

Melissa Mark-Viverito (left) with friends and members of the VMF look on as Gerald Meyer speaks at a key location about Congressman Vito Marcantonio.

VMF events in September & October 2015

Vito Marcantonio Forum Celebrates Pope Francis’ Visit and Italian American Culture Month with a People’s Pilgrimage to East Harlem

Vito Marcantonio Forum 2015

Saturday, Sept. 19, 2015 @ 12:00PM

Walking in the Footsteps of Vito Marcantonio.

Starting at Lucky Corner at the northeast corner of 116th St. & Lexington Ave at 12pm. Highlights include a visit to Vito Marcantonio’s home, Our Lady Queen of Angels Elementary School that Pope Francis is scheduled to visit (the church was shut down to parishioners’ protests in 2007). VMF will appeal to the Vatican to bless Marcantonio who was refused a Catholic burial by Cardinal Spellman in 1954. Route details will soon be posted to VitoMarcantonioForum.org  Weather will be great!

See below for a map of the tour. For questions or if you get lost, call or text Adam Meyer at 347.813.1396

Vito Marcantonio Forum - Program for Walking Tour of East Harlem_09-19-15

Map of Procession

 

____________________________________________________________________________________

Marcantonio and Immigration

VMF dramitization of Leonard Covello by LuLu LoLo PascaleThursday, October 15, from 2:00 to 3:30, @ CUNY’s Hostos Community College, Bronx, NY. This will be VMF’s 3rd program at Hostos. The focus for this program will be:

Marcantonio and Immigration.

Presenting: Professor Gerald Meyer with life-long East Harlem resident performance artist, LuLu LoLo Pascale and activist, actor and marketing expert, Roberto Ragone. The format encourages audience participation.

Light refreshments will be served | Admission is FREE!

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I’m Dying Now and I Did Not Kill Emmet Till

VMF - emmet till play flyer

THE PRODUCER’S CLUB
358 West 44th Street
New York, NY off 9th Ave
Admission is $10.00 

Friday, September 25, 2015 at 8PM
Saturday, September 26, 2015 at 8PM
Sunday, September 27, 2015 at 6PM

A play directed by VMF member Art Bernal with an acting appearance by VMF co-chairman Roberto Ragone.

The murder, the trial, the injustice for all is covered in this play. DON’T MISS IT. For more info, email dramaworkshopproject@gmail.com or call 201-416-9516

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Michael Parenti Book Presentation

waiting for yesterday by Michael Parenti

Saturday, October 31, 2015 from 2:00 to 4:00 @ NYPL’s Mulberry Branch Library, VMF will present a symposium on Waiting for Yesterday (Bordighera Press), Michael Parenti’s memoir of growing up in Italian Harlem. The event will be moderated by Gil Fagiani. Speakers will include author Stephen Siciliano and dramatizations by life-long East Harlem resident performance artist, LuLu LoLo Pascale and activist, actor and marketing expert, Roberto Ragone.

Parenti received his PhD in political science from Yale University and for many years, he taught political and social science at various institutions of higher learning. Eventually he devoted himself full-time to writing, public speaking, and political activism.

Parenti is the author of 23 books and many more articles. His highly acclaimed writings cover a wide range of subjects: U.S. politics, culture, ideology, political economy, imperialism, fascism, communism, democratic socialism, free-marketorthodoxies, conservative judicial activism, religion, ancient history, modern history, historiography, repression in academia, news and entertainment media, technology, environmentalism, sexism, racism, homophobia, Venezuela, the wars in Iraq and Yugoslavia, ethnicity, and his own early life.

Michael Parenti blog banner

Don’t miss these VMF events in September & October 2015!

Left Forum panel discussion on Sat May 30th at 12pm

 

Vito Marcantonio Forum at the Left Forum 2015

Congressman Vito Marcantonio (1934 to 1950):
Champion for Civil Rights

Featured Left Forum panel discussion and dramatization at the

John Jay College of Criminal Justice of the City University of New York 
Saturday, 5/30/15 at 12:00PM — 1:50PM in Room 1.105  

Abstract: Congressman Vito Marcantonio (1934 to 1950): Champion for Civil Rights Vito
Marcantonio, who represented East Harlem for seven terms, from 1934 to 1950, as the sole
Congressman of the American Labor Party, distinguished himself for his effective leadership as a national spokesperson of the Left. Closely allied with the Communist Party, Marcantonio
played major roles defending and advancing the progressive agenda.

This panel is devoted to Marcantonio’s extraordinary work in the fight for civil rights, both in
Congress and in his political work.

Specific aspects of his heroic efforts include: sponsoring legislation to abolish the poll tax,
recognize lynching as a federal crime, and enact the Federal Fair Employment Act as well as his fight
to integrate the blood banks and his support for the postwar petition to the United Nations charging the United States government with genocide against the African-American people.

The panel will also look at his work to aid individual African-American constituents. Lastly, the panel will analyze how Marc’s political and rhetorical style contributed  to  a  long  series  of  successes  that  were  achieved, most often, under highly  unfavorable circumstances. Panelists include: Dr. Gerald Meyer, Co‐Founder and Co‐Chair Vito Marcantonio Forum Roberto Ragone, Co‐Founder and Co‐Chair Vito Marcantonio Forum Gil Fagiani, (Speaker and Moderator), Founding Member of the Vito Marcantonio Forum

Left Forum is the largest annual conference of the broad Left in the United States. Each spring thousands of conference participants come together to discuss pressing local, national and global issues; to better understand commonalities and differences, and alternatives to current predicaments; or to share ideas to help build social movements to transform the world.

Also note that the following day at the Left Forum, Sunday, May 31 @ 3:40 PM, Room 1.123/Session 7, Gerald Meyer will be a panelist for Marxist Encounters with Anarchism. The event is sponsored by Science & Society.

This year’s theme of Left Forum is

“No Justice, No Peace: Confronting the Crises of Capitalism and Democracy” 

This year even features 1,600 Speakers and 420 Panels, Workshops and events

Please register online at www.LeftForum.org

The Vito Marcantonio Phenomenon and Commemoration of Morgan Powell

The Vito Marcantonio Forum Memorializes Morgan Powell;
and then Commemorates Vito Marcantonio

By Roberto Ragone
VMF Co-chair and Business Consultant
Ragone Enterprises and Productions
www.ragoneProductions.com

Morgan Powell | Bronx River Sankofa Tour Guide

A Momentum Towards Remembrance

Over several months the Vito Marcantonio Forum had begun a collaboration with the Drama Workshop Project in its second phase of activity to remember legendary Congressman Vito Marcantonio on the 60th anniversary of his death. Following  up on the official commemoration at Woodlawn Cemetery, “The Vito Marcantonio Phenomenon:  A Theatrical Reconstruction of Marcantonio’s Effective Radical Legacy” was gathering  much momentum leading up to October 19th, 2014.  Gaetana’s Restaurant was planning a welcoming atmosphere to friends and newcomers to celebrate Marcantonio’s life and reflect on his passing.

The Irony of a New Reason to Mourn

Then news of tragedy emerged 10 days before the event. Morgan Powell, founding member of the Vito Marcantonio Forum, had suddenly and inexplicably passed away. No one knew the details. Morgan, like Marcantonio, advocated for social justice, had a passion for history and its application – Morgan as a historian and community leader and Marcantonio as a political leader. Morgan applied these interests toward developing walking tours of the Bronx in connection of African Americans and the Bronx River.  I met Morgan when the city was revamping its recycling policies in 2003, but I observed his interest in all aspects of environmental conservation and sustainability.

Close friend Nilka Martell and Morgan Powell

Close friend Nilka Martell and Morgan Powell

However, over the ten days leading up to “The Vito Marcantonio Phenomenon” event, we realized Morgan ironically and sadly shared another element with Marcantonio:  he had not yet received a proper burial.  No family member had claimed his body to make a formal funeral arrangement. So his remains still remain with the City of New York. This sense of limbo was not elusive to those of us who are aware that Marcantonio’s passing — while motivating a memorial committee to form and raise money for a resting place and a book compiling his speeches — lacks closure because Cardinal Spellman refused to give him a Catholic burial.

Improvised Memorial

“The Vito Marcantonio Phenomenon” began with an improvised memorial for Morgan. After showing a 2.5 minute video put together by David Giglio offering a glimpse into Morgan’s life, Dr. Gerald Meyer began with a heartfelt eulogy reflecting on Morgan’s interest in social justice and how much of the work of Vito Marcantonio resonated with him. Meyer reflected on how in Marcantonio’s time, people stopped what they were doing to acknowledge the passing away of anyone, regardless of status, as the departed passed by in a funeral procession. Adults stopped working. Children stopped playing.  In death, the VMF must have that same departure from its planned activities and have stillness and silence for the passing of a person, who was not just a friend, but a comrade.  Gerald observed asked the audience to appreciate the distinction: “comradeship is more than a friendship; friendships come and go based on emotion, but comradeship is forever, comradeship is based on having similar values, working together for common good.”

saudy tejada

Saudy Tejada

After reflections from Saudy Tejada, who was a friend to Morgan in the Bronx and a partner in social justice causes, and from Gigi Assante, who wrote a poem dedicated to Morgan, I offered my own thoughts to conclude the memorial. I recalled meeting Morgan while working in government and participating with him at an electronics recycling event that led to a conversation about Vito Marcantonio. After sending Morgan a copy of Dr. Meyer’s article about Marcantonio’s funeral (“Italian Harlem’s Biggest Funeral”), which included examples of Marcantonio’s advocacy for African Americans and the role of W.E.B. Dubois as an honorary pall bearer, Morgan shortly contacted me thereafter, expressing how impressed and inspired he was and expressed gratitude for my sharing the article with him. Morgan observed: “How come I’ve never heard of this guy?”  I’ve heard this reaction before but permanently remembered it when Morgan poignantly uttered those words.  I told the October 19th audience that Morgan’s statement may be a universal reaction they and others may have as they learn about Marcantonio.

Brian Kavanagh (D) Assemblyman, ManhattanI recalled introducing Morgan to several of my friends including Brian Kavanagh, whose inauguration Morgan would volunteer for in 2007, after Brian became an Assemblyman. I recollected the ”Seinfeldesque circumstances” leading up to Morgan’s participation in the Vito Marcantonio Forum.  After telling Gerald I had a pre-scheduled commitment but had invited Morgan to the founding meeting of the Vito Marcantonio Forum, Gerald expressed concerned: so many interested parties, who had done prior work on Marcantonio, would be cramming into his home, with a shortage of space and food to ensue. Gerald suggested I defer Morgan’s participation to a future meeting, and still designate him a founding member. However, I could not reach Morgan in time; so, Morgan attended the meeting, and apparently made his presence felt: he hit the ground running and became a founding member through his official attendance.

Morgan would take an interest in Marcantonio’s role in Marcantonio’s activism on desegration, civil rights and economic justice.  I recall a Bronx River Sankofa PowerPoint presentation I attended in 2012 when Morgan brought up segregated book banks in Bronx hospitals, and then completely by coincidence at a VMF meeting a week later, Gerald Meyer mentioning Marcantonio’s role in desegregating the blood banks nationwide.

Vito Marcantonio Forum members Roberto Ragone and Morgan Powell on BronxNet News

Vito Marcantonio Forum members Roberto Ragone and Morgan Powell on BronxNet News (click the image to see the video).

This sad irony deepens when we consider the two final acts Morgan undertook for the organization:  1) He obtained a last minute article in the “Bronx Chronicle,” and an 11th hour interview for both of us on “Bronxnet TV” to promote the August 9th event officially commemorating the 60th Anniversary of Vito Marcantonio’s death (watch the video on BronxNet.org).  Morgan wanted to ensure Marcantonio was properly remembered on that milestone date.  2) He composed an article about the event and then describing all the significant New York City locations in Marcantonio’s life. This action, similar to promoting the ceremony at Woodlawn cemetery, helped give everyone a sense of history and placement for Marcantonio.  I told the audience one of the last things I said to Morgan was his article is an essential component to the VMF’s efforts to produce a documentary on Marcantonio’s life.  Revealing his signature cheerfulness and smile, Morgan was proud of the spillover benefit.

After Gerald led a one minute moment of silence, Roberto announced a brief intermission and then the official program began.

Recap of the Official August 9th Commemoration at Woodlawn Cemetery in the Bronx

Approximately 50 to 60 attended the October 19 event, which was filmed by David Giglio and whose visuals were overseen by Adam Milat-Meyer, who worked Kevin O’Connor on acoustics.

Vito Marcantonio Forum founders Gerald Meyer, LuLu LoLo Pascale, Adam Milat-Meyer, and Roberto Ragone with City Council Speaker of the House Melissa Mark-Viverito at Woodlawn Cemetery in the Bronx 2014

Gerald Meyer, LuLu LoLo Pascale, Melissa Mark-Viverito, Adam Milat-Meyer, and Roberto Ragone

The “Vito Marcantonio Phenomeon” began with introductions, identifying both sponsoring organizations, and noted the event would present “The People’s Proclamation for The People’s Politician.”  I pointed out that the VMF document would become the template for proclamations issued by Speaker of the New York City Council Melissa Mark-Viverito, Assemblyman Robert J. Rodriguez, both of whom attended the event, along with State Senator Jose M. Serrano, Council Member Andrew Cohen, Manhattan Borough President Gale A. Brewer, Bronx Borough President Ruben Diaz, Jr., Congressman Charles D. Rangel, and Congressman Eliot L. Engel — whose written declaration acknowledging Marcantonio’s accomplishment would become part of the Congressional Record.  (Assemblyman Brian Kavanagh also attended the event.) The announcement that Speaker Mark-Viverito was committed to working with the VMF on a street-naming in East Harlem for Marcantonio generated loud applause.

The Marcantonio Phenomenon: The Set-up

Litany of San Vito by Gil Fagiani memorialcard for Marcantonio

Memorial cards given out at Woodlawn Cemetery 8/9/14

The first presentation was a very brief poem written by VMF member, Gil Fagiani, entitled Litany of San Vito, and read by Vito Marcantonio Forum Treasurer, Adam Milat-Meyer. It has become a tradition for the VMF to begin its events with this poem. It serves as a clearing statement or prayer. Everyone followed along with a copy of the poem in a postcard at their seats (distributed along with their programs). These postcards looked like mass cards for Marcantonio. Co-emcee, Marilyn Ocasio, of the Drama Workshop Project, introduced a brief film by David Giglio entitled: Vito Marcantonio (1902-1954): Synopsis of a Large Life. With a narration written by Gerald and myself with my recitation as voice-over, the film briefly appetizes the attendees with bits and pieces of Marcantonio’s life  and contributions, the role of the Vito Marcantonio Forum, and the success of advancing knowledge of Vito Marcantonio through our August 9 event.

 

The People’s Proclamation for the People’s Politician and Performances: Theatrical Reconstructions and Juxtapositions

Proceeding with the remainder of the program, I light heartedly explained an “artistic difference” between myself and Gerald Meyer over whether the volunteers reading the segments of the proclamation should read their part straight through together one after the other or should the readers be interspersed throughout the program. Assuming the audience would appreciate and engage in the “campfire” reading of the proclamation even more if broken up, I matched up sections of the proclamation thematically with a performance piece. I jokingly told the audience I wagered Gerald Meyer $10,000 they would like the juxtapositions, and asked the audience to ride the rollercoaster, experience the beta test, and at least pretend to like the show since I wouldn’t have the money to pay off the bet.”

vmf presentation of the heart is the teacher by leonard covello

Click on the image above to get a copy signed by Dr Gerald Meyer

With Marilyn Ocasio guiding the remainder of the program, Frank Marcantonio announced the beginning of The People’s Proclamation for the People’s Politician and read the first few whereas clauses about Marcantonio’s Italian background and his childhood,  touching on Dr. Leonard Covello’s role as his high school teacher, intellectual mentor, mentor, and collaborator. Eduardo Sanchez then performed a dramatization of Leonard Covello reading from his autobiography, The Heart is the Teacher, reflecting on his encounters when he taught Marcantonio at Dewitt Clinton High School.  In the scene, set in 1921, young Marcantonio and Board of Alderman President Fiorello LaGuardia interject themselves on cue as Covello’s reflections also serve as narration.

After a reading from the proclamation by Alfonzo Hollis about Marcantonio’s political work for Fiorello LaGuardia and his constituency services for over 300 people per week from different ethnic backgrounds and races, Sarah Marcantonio Coursey continued with a set of whereas clauses about Marcantonio’s advocacy for Italian Americans.  Marilyn Ocasio then introduced a dramatization with me as Marcantonio delivering a speech to a radio audience in July 1942 defending Italian Americans against discrimination during World War II when they were under suspicion because the United States was at war with the nation of Italy. Marilyn pointed out the speech was submitted to the Congressional Record and was one of several speeches in the program that are included the book, I Vote My Conscience: The Writings, Speeches, and Debates of Vito Marcantonio.

Vito Marcantonio Forum member and Bronx author and historian, Christopher Bell

Author and Historian, Christopher Bell

After VMF member Christopher Bell read several Whereas clauses highlighting Marcantonio’s fight against the poll tax and for anti-lynching laws, his successful defense of W.E.B. Dubois and William Paterson, the appearance of the three together before the United Nations Security Council on behalf of African Americans, and the Congessman’s role in breaking the major league baseball color barrier, an astonished audience resoundingly applauded these accomplishments. Grasping the format of the event, the audience would also warmly acknowledge each reader, especially when a celebrity, such as Frank Sinatra or Jackie Robinson, became part of the drama in the story. After Bell’s reading, I dramatized a splicing of Marcantonio’s speeches from 1949 to the House of Representatives opposing the poll tax.

LaGuardia with FDR

LaGuardia with FDR

Ocasio then introduced Rita Barakos, whose singular yet comprehensive ‘Whereas’ clause spoke to Marcantonio’s advocacy for Puerto Rico and Puerto Ricans. I then dramatized a Marcantonio speech from 1947 about Puerto Rico’s plight as a result of  US economic policy and the cause of Puerto Rican migration to the mainland, indirectly addressing the misconception that the East Harlem Representative “brought the Puerto Ricans to New York” – propaganda used to mobilize voters against him.

After a set of ‘Whereas’ clauses read by Eduardo Sanchez regarding Marcantonio’s political party designations, his movement into the American Labor Party, and the effort to get rid of him through the Wilson Pakula Act, four members of the Drama Workshop Project performed a scene written by Roberto Ragone combining historical facts and creative license about the circumstances of the time. It was a scene between LaGuardia, played by Art Bernal, and Marcantonio arguing over the prospect of creating a viable third party and weighing the propaganda of criticism against Marcantonio by the press and the political establishment. In that scene, Eduardo Sanchez plays a WCBS radio broadcaster. Marilyn Ocasio served as the narrator.

Vito Marcantonio_Photo of Actrors, Roberto Ragone, Marilyn Ocasio, Eduardo Sanchez, Art Bernal

Roberto Ragone, Marilyn Ocasio, Eduardo Sanchez,  and Art Bernal

Following the scene, Art Bernal explained the drama behind the campaign of 1948 (written by me to be non-partisan):  “With all of America watching, Marcantonio would win in 1948 despite the Wilson Pakula Act. However, LaGuardia’s death in September 1947 would deprive the Progressive Party of a formidable Vice Presidential candidate in the 1948 election cycle.”  As Adam Milat-Meyer placed the famous photo on the screen of President Harry Truman from 1948, Bernal pointed out that “we now see an endearing image of Democrat Harry Truman winning the 1948 presidential race, despite the predictions by the newspapers that night that he would lose to Republican Thomas Dewey,” noting the Chicago Daily Tribune’s  premature headline — Dewey Defeats Truman — which “Truman holds, beaming with glee.” Bernal’s presentation underscores the failure of people to know or recognize the Presidential race was close partly due to the Progressive Party’s siphoning of votes from the Democratic Party, and that the Democratic Party adopted portions of the Progressive Party’s agenda, including civil rights, to avoid defeat.

vito marcantonio forum - president-harry-truman-displaying-chicago-daily-tribune-headline-dewey-defeats-truman

The presentation asked the public to imagine if LaGuardia had lived and campaigned as the Vice Presidential candidate with Vito Marcantonio, Henry Wallace, and actor/activist, Paul Robeson for the Progressive Party: “The Progressive Party could have pulled away enough votes, for Republican Dewey to actually beat Truman, making the Progressive Party a force to be reckoned with as a third party.”  Referring back to the dramatization of the anti-poll tax speech, Bernal pointed out that when the Democrats abandoned their civil rights agenda in 1949, Marcantonio took aim at Northern hypocrisy, and criticized a New York City run by Mayor Bill O’Dwyer that was fraught with discrimination, segregation, and police brutality – an admission Marcantonio readily makes to his Southern Congressional colleagues in the dramatized speech before the House of Representatives.

Picking up on the last thread, Marilyn Ocasio refers to a campaign poster from David Giglio’s film along with the photo of Ralph Fasanella’s painting in the written program (displayed on the screen by Adam Milat-Meyer) to help the audience visualize Marcantonio’s 1949 run for Mayor against Bill O’Dwyer. In the painting, entitled Marcantonio for Mayor, Marcantonio gives a speech in 1949 at a distant podium at the Lucky Corner of East 116th Street and Lexington Avenue.  Marilyn noted, “Marcantonio would lose the Mayor’s race despite his many votes, and this would set up his last stand in 1950.”

Terry Doyle recited a series of Whereas clauses describing Marcantonio’s opposition to popular legislation, including the anti-labor Taft-Hartly Act,  and  politically charged foreign policy positions, casting the sole votes against the Marshall Plan and intervention in the Korean conflict. This segued to the final Marcantonio dramatization. My presentation spliced two speeches by Marcantonio from July 1950 in which he opposes the Korean War, and his final speech in 1950 when he warns America against militarism and unjustified foreign intervention.

Final Reflections

Vito Marcantonio Forum | Marc and Paul Robeson

Henry Wallace, Marc, and Paul Robeson

Alfonzo Hollis’ reading of a series of Whereas clauses pondered the impact of Marcantonio’s death set up the performance of Paul Robeson’s eulogy to Marcantonio.  Robeson’s remarks had been published in his newspaper — called Freedom — when Marcantonio died, but were never orated in any gathering.  The performance on October 19th  was a dramatization of how Paul Robeson would have delivered that speech had he addressed an audience on the day Marcantonio died. The speech so captured Robeson’s deep felt sentiments through a slow, impassioned voice with brief moments of pause for reflection, the presentation received a standing ovation.

Marilyn Ocasio then called Frank Marcantonio back up to the podium to conclude The People’s Proclamation, providing a symmetry for his setting the proclamation in motion at the beginning of the program.  He pointed out Cardinal Spellman’s refusal to provide a Catholic burial, Marcantonio’s interment at historic  Woodlawn cemetery near his wife and Fiorello LaGuardia, and  with emotion building up and contained, Frank shared the words on Marcantonio’s tombstone: “Vito Marcantonio: Defender of Human Rights.”  After pointing to the growing interest in Marcantonio’s  life since the late 1990’s,  he  declares the final resolution statements towards which the Whereas clauses had been building:

Therefore, be it known, that The Vito Marcantonio Forum is convinced that the life and work of Vito Marcantonio have been unfairly ignored and present to people today guidelines for a progressive politics that promises significant gains for a more genuinely democratic United
States; and

Therefore, be it further known, that the those assembled and future signators of any paper or online petition of “The People’s Proclamation for The People’s Politician,” with pride,
honor the contributions of Representative Vito Marcantonio and their benefit to New York City, the nation, and the world along with the efforts of the Vito Marcantonio Forum to honor the Congressman’s memory on the 60th Anniversary of his death on August 9, 2014, and beyond.

The audience was surprise, pleasantly caught off guard as they realized they were being offered an opportunity to participate in the program – in the theatrical reconstruction of “The Vito Marcantonio Phenomenon” and his “Effective Radical Legacy” — that one can arguably further subtitle “The Passion of Vito Marcantonio.” Carrying out a suggestion to me by Gerald, Frank Marantonio made a motion to approve “ The People’s Proclamation for the People’s Politician.” After Frank said, “All in favor, say, aye,” there was a collectively spontaneous and immediate proclaimed “Aye” from the audience with laughter as Frank asked, “all opposed?”

Frank Marcantonio

Attorney Frank Marcantonio

My experiment juxtaposing the proclamation and the performances seemed to succeed. (I never mentioned the fake $10,000 bet again, in case it was a bad joke.)

As mentioned, I had expected the readers to recite their Whereas clauses, contributing to the narrative and back story, and then simply return to their seats with no audience response. This is because other than Frank Marcantonio’s conclusion to the proclamation, the rest of the document left the story of the Marcantonio phenomenon an open-ended cliffhanger. Instead, the audience applauded  each reader for providing another revealing and remarkable insight about Marcantonio.

Conclusion

Dr Gerald Meyer

Dr Gerald Meyer

After Gerald Meyer announced that the next event of the VMF would take place during Black History Month to explore VMF member Christopher Bell’s three books about East Harlem (click here to purchase on amazon.com), I thanked everyone for appreciating the presentation and its format along with their participation in mourning the loss of Morgan Powell. I then acknowledged all participants in both the memorial and the performances who shared their time, energy, and emotion so the audience can come away enlightened and inspired about and by both Morgan and Marcantonio, and hopefully motivated to tackle contemporary issues that remain relevant from Marcantonio’s time.

Special thanks for that day  go to:

Infrastructure

Frank Saponara, the Restaurant Owner, for being so open to the subject matter and for hosting a second VMF event at his restaurant with complimentary appetizers and discounted wine.

Kevin O’Connor, Live Audio Engineer, who made himself available at the last minute to provide the technical support.

Members of the Vito Marcantonio Forum who participated in carrying out the event:

Rita Barakos

Charles Bayer

Christopher Bell

Terry Doyle

David Giglio

Rosemary Siciliano

Adam Milat-Meyer

Dr. Gerald Meyer


Members of the Drama Workshop Project

Art Bernal

Alfonzo Hollis

Bernard Johnson

Marilyn Ocasio

Eduardo Sanchez


Family Members

Sarah Marcantonio Coursey

Frank Marcantonio

The Drama of the Vito Marcantonio Phenomenon (1902-1954)

Vito Marcantonio Forum & The Drama Workshop Project Present a FREE Performance:

A Theatrical Reconstruction of Congressman Vito Marcantonio’s Effective Radical Legacy

Gaetana’s Restaurant — 143 Christopher Street (on the NW corner of Greenwich St) in New York City | Sunday, Oct 19th 2014 | 12pm to 4pm

Video: Vito Marcantonio: Synopsis of A Great Life (Being Updated)

Theatrical Resurrection of Congressman Vito Marcantonio’s Radical Legacy

WHAT: The Vito Marcantonio Forum will present a theatrical presentation through dramatizations of his speeches as well as remarks from his contemporaries and supporters, Paul Robeson and Leonard Covello. The audience will move through creative monologues, and scenes between Marcantonio and his mentor, Mayor Fiorello LaGuardia. Audience participants will be pre-selected to read segments from a script entitled: A People’s Proclamation for the People’s Politician.

WHO: The Vito Marcantonio Forum or the VMF is an educational organization that studies and highlights the career of the seven-term Congressman from East Harlem and promotes public awareness of Vito Marcantonio’s historical and cultural contributions that addressed the familiar issues of immigration, civil rights, civil liberties, foreign aid, taxation and affordable housing, making him a model for contemporary politicians. This special event is co-sponsored by the Vito Marcantonio Forum & The Drama Workshop Project.

The VMF sponsors scholarly presentations within the framework of artistic events such as poetry, film, and theater and is available to perform in other venues. For inquiries contact,www.vitomarcantonioforum.org

WHEN: Sunday, Oct 19th 2014 | 12pm to 4pm

WHERE: Gaetana’s Restaurant: 143 Christopher Street (on the NW corner of Greenwich St) in New York City

COST: Gratis – Gaetana’s will donate appetizers and discounted house wine, but we encourage guests to purchase lunch. Limited the first 50 people so RSVP today at: vitomarcantonoforum@gmail.com or by phone: Roberto Ragone (917-923-4765)

Roberto Ragone, Actor/Business Consultant, as Congressman Vito Marcantonio

Art Bernal, Actor/Director, as Mayor Fiorello LaGuardia

Bernard Johnson, Actor/Director, as Paul Robeson

Eduardro Sanchez, Actor, as Dr. Leonard Covello

Marilyn Ocasio, Actress, Scene Narrator

Concluding Remarks: Dr. Gerald Meyer, author of Vito Marcantonio: Radical Politician (1902-1954)

 

vito marcantonio forum | gerald meyer lulu lolo pascale melissa mark-viverito adam milat-meyer roberto ragone

Thanks to everyone who attended the VMF Memorial Service August 9th

On behalf of the Vito Marcantonio Forum, we would like to thank everyone who contributed. We could not have done it alone and we appreciate the help.

Melissa Mark Viverito, Speaker of the New York City Council, delivered an inspiring speech for everyone in attendance. We will post video soon. BronxNet TV covered the event as well as American Oggi

Check out VMF members on BronxNet News!

Can’t tell you how proud we are to have Vito Marcantonio Forum members Roberto Ragone and Morgan Powell representing our upcoming event in their interview on BronxNet News.

Covello event at Hostos was a hit!

Leonard Covello’s The Heart is the Teacher was rereleased

with the newer edition including an afterward written by Dr. Gerald Meyer

The people at Hostos were kind enough to throw an event in the Vito Marcantonio Room on May Day, 2014 and the event was a success.

IMG_0957 IMG_0959

Professor Meyer gave a lecture on the book and the background of Covello and Italian East Harlem during the 1930’s–1950’s. After this, LuLu LoLo Pascale (who personally knew Covello) and Roberto Ragone performed dramatic readings from the book. The Vito Marcantonio Forum thanks everyone who helped put together the event at Hostos and everyone who attended.

Check out this cell phone video of it on youtube: